Category Archives: History and Folklore

This is what happens when you take meetings with folklorists in attics.

This is what happens when you arrange lunch with a folklorist whose office is in the university attic. This is what I was looking at the whole time. I think our discussion lasted about five minutes before Dr. Gilthead stopped politely pretending not to notice that I was distracted by the collection of bottles in the window behind his desk… (more…)

January at the Olina Museum: Urban Wilderness, Mysterious Mathematickal Art, and the Return of the Old Iron Project

Happy New Year, my lovelies! It’s January on the Magothy, and you know what that means (or maybe you don’t): the much-awaited re-opening of the Olina Museum in the Printer’s Quarter. Nagspeakers have been waiting five years for the Olina to swing wide its doors after the destruction of the Walker Folkways Wing in what has been variously described as… (more…)

The Funicular Railway

The Ledge: Why the Funicular Railway Ends in the Middle of Nowhere The passengers to make the inaugural climb on the Funicular Railway included four of the city’s top ranking officials, a cub reporter who had no business being there, and a man nobody in Nagspeake is sure ever existed. The uncertain man read a poem, and in so doing,… (more…)

Who Knew?

Tales of the Horless and Deglov Players have been circulating, in some form or other, since the old pirate days. An antique shanty tells of a man who, even after being made brave by drink, still won’t go with his crewmates to the show where “the poppet-man’s packing ’em in.” He waits in vain all night for his mates to… (more…)

The Basilica of St. Horace Rye, Creve Coeur

Signs and Portents and Stained Glass Saint Horace Rye is a perfect example of why people continue to search for meaning–or if not meaning, than evidence of something more than plain everyday squalor–in Shantytown. It’s a persistent myth, and the extent to which people talk about it is inversely proportional to the extent to which people believe it.  Something significant… (more…)

Who Knew?

Edward Marie Bear has lived in Flotilla for sixty-seven years, which makes him the fifth-oldest living resident of that district. He has been a competitive worm grunter since age thirteen and still holds the world record for Most Worms Raised by Rhythmic Use of a Kitchen Whisk. His collection of worms, including over five thousand specimens representing twelve worm phyla… (more…)

Tales from Nagspeake Raconteurs

Welcome to the home of Nagspeake Folklore on the Web! As you might expect, in a city in which primary sources have such a relatively brief shelf-life, the oral tradition is alive and well in Nagspeake, and the Creve Coeur Folklore Society works tirelessly to record the great storytellers of our time for the benefit of those that follow. Good… (more…)

Nagspeake, Past and Presumed

Nagspeake history is a chimerical beast, sphinxlike and inscrutable, and impossible to summarize at 1am after several drinks. Look for a complete, encyclopedic history of Nagspeake from the brief grounding here of a reed boat from Damascus a full fifty years before the Viking landing at Newfoundland, to the abandonment of the Magothy basin for the next hundred years, to… (more…)