This is what happens when you take meetings with folklorists in attics.

This is what happens when you arrange lunch with a folklorist whose office is in the university attic. This is what I was looking at the whole time. I think our discussion lasted about five minutes before Dr. Gilthead stopped politely pretending not to notice that I was distracted by the collection of bottles in the window behind his desk… (more…)

The Funicular Railway

The Ledge: Why the Funicular Railway Ends in the Middle of Nowhere The passengers to make the inaugural climb on the Funicular Railway included four of the city’s top ranking officials, a cub reporter who had no business being there, and a man nobody in Nagspeake is sure ever existed. The uncertain man read a poem, and in so doing,… (more…)

The Basilica of St. Horace Rye, Creve Coeur

Signs and Portents and Stained Glass Saint Horace Rye is a perfect example of why people continue to search for meaning–or if not meaning, than evidence of something more than plain everyday squalor–in Shantytown. It’s a persistent myth, and the extent to which people talk about it is inversely proportional to the extent to which people believe it.  Something significant… (more…)

Tales from Nagspeake Raconteurs

Welcome to the home of Nagspeake Folklore on the Web! As you might expect, in a city in which primary sources have such a relatively brief shelf-life, the oral tradition is alive and well in Nagspeake, and the Creve Coeur Folklore Society works tirelessly to record the great storytellers of our time for the benefit of those that follow. Good… (more…)