Tag Archives: Kate Milford

January at the Olina Museum: Urban Wilderness, Mysterious Mathematickal Art, and the Return of the Old Iron Project

Happy New Year, my lovelies! It’s January on the Magothy, and you know what that means (or maybe you don’t): the much-awaited re-opening of the Olina Museum in the Printer’s Quarter. Nagspeakers have been waiting five years for the Olina to swing wide its doors after the destruction of the Walker Folkways Wing in what has been variously described as… (more…)

A Special Welcome for Age of Steam Readers!

It seems like only yesterday we were sending her out on yet another a coffee run, but today our very own Kate Milford is being interviewed on a lovely blog called Age of Steam! Frequent guests here at the NBTC website might remember Kate as our erstwhile intern before we hired Fennel; some of you might also know that Kate… (more…)

Killer Real Estate Opportunity in Historic Printer’s Quarter!

Love the NBTC? Want to work here?? Well, you can’t. Or rather, you can’t work at the NBTC, because between Kate and Miranda we have plenty of people to get our coffee and make sure our paperclips are all perfectly flat with the loops all exactly in line. (Because nothing makes inter-office correspondence less professional than bent-up paperclips, as everyone… (more…)

Christmas on the Magothy: We Have a Winner!

Back in August, Gillymole Press announced its return to mainstream publishing with the Christmas on the Magothy Serial Fiction Contest, which we here at the NBTC were so excited about until some idiot who was still bent out of shape about a series Gillymole ran…what?…four years ago or something (get over it people, at some point we have to stop… (more…)

The Funicular Railway

The Ledge: Why the Funicular Railway Ends in the Middle of Nowhere The passengers to make the inaugural climb on the Funicular Railway included four of the city’s top ranking officials, a cub reporter who had no business being there, and a man nobody in Nagspeake is sure ever existed. The uncertain man read a poem, and in so doing,… (more…)

The Basilica of St. Horace Rye, Creve Coeur

Signs and Portents and Stained Glass Saint Horace Rye is a perfect example of why people continue to search for meaning–or if not meaning, than evidence of something more than plain everyday squalor–in Shantytown. It’s a persistent myth, and the extent to which people talk about it is inversely proportional to the extent to which people believe it.  Something significant… (more…)